Thriving as an Empath: 365 Days of Self-Care for Sensitive People is a book by Judith Orloff M.D., and it has touched a topic that not a lot of books touch.

When we talk of empathic people, we are referring to people with “a higher sensitivity to outside stimuli such as sounds, big personalities, and hectic environments … who feel things very deeply,” according to Kim Egel, a San Diego-based therapist.

Empaths tend to forget that they need to take care of themselves too. Keep reading to learn more!

What is the Book About?

In the book, Thriving as an Empath: 365 Days of Self-Care for Sensitive People, you will learn a lot of meditation systems, perspectives, as well as self-care practices.

When you start to grow as an empath, there is a great chance that you will feel that you have to change the world and everyone in it. As much as you remain compassionate, you start to think about yourself.

In this book, you are taught about how you can love people around you without spending your days trying to be a martyr.

It is common to see an empath sacrificing himself or herself for others, without thinking about what happens to them. At the end of the day, they are burnt out and have no life of their own. This is one reason this book, Thriving as an Empath: 365 Days of Self-Care for Sensitive People, was written by Orloff.

She is a psychiatrist and empath that understands how similar people all over the world tend to burn themselves out while taking care of others, and forget about themselves. It is common to see them stressed out.

In this book, you are taught about self-care practices that you could try and make your own. You’ll also learn other common traits of an empath.

The fact that you have the extraordinary gifts of sensitivity doesn’t mean that you should not care about yourself. The fact that you have an intimate connection with others and have an open heart doesn’t mean that you should not think of yourself.

Another Note About Empaths

It is no news that sensitive people tend to feel that they have to put the burden of the world on themselves. They feel they have to be the messiah that will make everyone happy.

The issue with empaths is that they don’t think the same way that others think. They can be likened to SpongeBob. If you have watched Sponge Bob Square Pants, there is a great chance that you noticed a special quality about him. He is an empath (in terms of a sensitive cartoon kid’s character). Once anyone close to him is sad, he tries to help them. This is the case of an empath. We are emotional sponges. 

The most extreme of us may also be called codependent. By joining a 12-Step Program such as Codependents Anonymous or Al-Anon, you can start to get help for your deeply compulsive habits of caretaking and sometimes your low self-esteem.

Once someone comes close to us, and we notice that they are saddened, we reach out and try to find out what is wrong. When we do, we try to solve the issue, even to our detriment. We have found empaths being broken constantly, because they spend their money or emotional and mental energy solving the issues of others while forgetting to take care of themselves.